Monthly Archives: March 2011

Part-time and temp work – lifestyle choice or Hobson’s choice?

If you thought that London out-booming Mumbai, Shanghai and Hong Kong was counterintuitive, try this – part-time women in professional occupations earn 1.6% more than their full-time male counterparts! Part-time professional women earn, on average, £22.82 an hour while full-time professional men earn £22.47 … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments

Banks reaffirm their faith in London

Perhaps there has been a bankers’ exodus after all – from other cities to London. Bloomberg reports that banks and other financial services organisations in the City are now approaching pre-recession levels of employment. Even RBS now employs more people in … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Will the 21st century be Asian or Arctic?

A broad consensus has developed, over the last decade or so, that the balance of power in the world is shifting away from North America, Europe and Japan  and towards East Asia, South Asia and Latin America. Liberal economists talk about the rebalancing of … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

The public sector will not ‘get back to normal’

The Economist has a series of articles on the future of the state. The paper’s broad conclusion is that western welfare state can’t go on as it is. Its editorial describes the state spending of the 2000s as “one last splurge” … Continue reading

Posted in Peak State, Public Finances, Public Sector, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

What CAMRA tells us about markets

Last week was the fortieth birthday of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA). Described by a government minister as the most successful consumer group in Europe, it revolutionised (or perhaps counter-revolutionised) the beer market in the UK. Contrary to popular myth, CAMRA was not … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 13 Comments

Why don’t journalists link to their sources?

Ben Goldacre has a piece in today’s Guardian criticising journalists who don’t link to primary sources. He quotes examples of spurious stories in the Daily Mail and the Telegraph, which completely distorted the results of academic studies to support some quite bonkers … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Name that behaviour

On Wednesday I wrote about avoiding combat mode in arguments and other difficult conversations. Of course, this can be hard to do in the moment, especially when you are being verbally attacked by someone. One way of deflecting such attacks is to … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments